Sino-U.S. geo-political competition, high-tech cold war and their implications for the global financial market

By Dr Ming-chin Monique Chu, Lecturer in Chinese Politics at the University of Southampton.

Panel photo

 

Dr. Ming-chin Monique Chu, Lecturer in Chinese Politics at the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Southampton, was invited to take part in a panel debate at Sibos 2019 held in London last week. During the debate, she shed light on the implications of Sino-U.S. high-tech cold war and other risk factors for the global financial industry. Also in the panel were Gerard Lyons (Netwealth Investments) and Elizabeth Rosenberg (Centre for a New American Security). For the recorded session at Sibos, a global financial industry event with more than 9,000 delegates held every year, see: https://www.sibos.com/media/video/big-issue-debate-navigating-era-renewed-great-power-competition-25-sept-2019.

On 28th August 2019, Monique was quoted by the South China Morning Post for an in-depth news analysis of China’s semiconductor industry: https://www.scmp.com/tech/big-tech/article/3024687/how-china-still-paying-price-squandering-its-chance-build-home-grown.

Monique has published two books (one co-edited) including The East Asian Computer Chip War (Routledge, 2013/2016), which was cited by the Semiconductor Industry Association’s 2015 annual report. Her research interests include globalization-security nexus with reference to semiconductors, artificial intelligence and security, problematic sovereignty on China’s periphery, and Chinese foreign policy. She has appeared in many international news media such as BBC World News, BBC World Service, Fuji Television Network, Radio France International, Deutsche Welle, and South China Morning Post.

 

Gender and leadership in Taiwan-China relations

By Dr Ming-chin Monique Chu, Lecturer in Chinese Politics at the University of Southampton.


PAIR’s Dr Monique Chu spoke on the BBC World Service last week in response to an article on Chinese state media claiming Taiwan’s recently elected leader Tsai Ing-wen has an “extremist style” because she is unmarried.

Dr Chu contends that these sexist comments reflect a deep sense of anxiety and insecurity in Beijing over the election of Tsai, whose Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) has historically favoured Taiwanese independence. 

You can watch the full interview below.